Captain Heck (capthek) wrote in futurenanotech,
Captain Heck
capthek
futurenanotech

For the nanointerested...

This is actually super cool, a ten year jump in technological standards within 18 months?!? As many of you know, our economy has been down in the dumps lately, but large technological steps can get a stagnant economy moving again, cool! I haden't really seen anything on the technological horizon that wasn't just theoretical for quite some time. This jump will make many current products vastly out of date and strongly encourage the consumption of all new technological devices and it will encourage years of innovation.

Days May Be Numbered for Flash Memory
http://news.yahoo.com/s/pcworld/139081;_ylt=Au2xjcav_SkLvjvitr_dM3thr7sF
Maxwell Cooter, Techworld.com Tue Oct 30, 12:00 PM ET

The humble USB drive could soon be using a new type of memory thanks to research from the Arizona State University.

The college's Center for Applied Nanoionics (CANi) has developed a new technique for storing memory that could lead to flash memory being superseded in a number of years.

The new memory technology, which is known as programmable metallization cell (PMC), has been developed to counteract the physical limits of current memory storage technology. The college claimed that PMC could be a 1,000 times more efficient than existing flash memory and could enable devices like USB drives to greatly increase the memory of digital cameras, MP3 players and laptops.

The problem that CANi has been tackling is the physical limit of how much storage can be crammed into any given space as pushing atoms closer together causes more heat to be formed. PMC, which has been developed in conjunction with German institute, the J|lich Research Center, works by altering the way that ions are treated.

According to the ASU's own publication, ASU Insight, the methodology involves the new technique of nanoionics, where, Instead of moving electrons among charged particles, called ions, as in traditional electronics, nanoionics moves the ions themselves.

"We've actually been able to move something the size of a virus between electrodes to switch them from a high resistance to a low resistance, which is great for memory," Michael Kozicki, director of CANi, told ASU Insight

Best of all, the new technique can be used on existing, conventional storage which means that the cost will not be prohibitive.

"In using readily available materials, we've provided a way for this memory to be made at essentially zero extra cost, because the materials you need are already used in the chips-- all you have to do is mix them in a slightly different way," said Kozicki.

It might not be too long before we see products incorporating the new technology. Kozicki estimates that the first commercial product could be within 18 months. PMC has already attracted interest from several memory vendors, including Micron Technology. Samsung, Sony and IBM have also been interested in the technology.
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